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Hydroponics

14 Vegetables you can grow hydroponically (and 10 you can’t)

If you are familiar with me and my blog then you know that I LOVE my Aerogarden Farm Plus and all the things I can grow with it hydroponically. I use it to grow food year-round in my basement as well as using it to start my seedlings for the things I intend to grow outside during the summer. While I can’t grow everything down in the basement garden, you may be surprised how much I can and do grow. In my books, it’s all about becoming more sustainable one day at a time.

Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Growing celery hydroponically
My baby celery

I have definitely tried to push the boundaries in what I can grow down in the basement garden. So times I learned the hard way (with the peas) and other times I was pleasantly surprised (like the celery). I mean practically every recipe calls for like 1 or 2 stalks of celery. The rest of it easily gets forgotten in the back of the crisper. Fun fact I learned from my dad, if you wrap it in aluminum foil (shiny side in) it stays crisp for a VERY long time. But I would still rather harvest it a stalk at a time from the basement.

So with that in mind let’s take a look at 14 things that you can grow relatively easy in your Aerogarden. In truth, its actually way more than 14 but I grouped things like “herbs” into a single item otherwise the list would have been long, to say the least. So let’s just call it 14 and move on to the list.

Aerogarden Farm Plus

Plants that can be grown hydroponically

I am going to separate this list into three sections, those that do not require pollination, those that are self-pollinated and those that need manual pollination. Most of the list falls under the set it and forget it headings of no pollination or self-pollination which is good news for you. Only two are going to require manual intervention.

No pollination needed

  1. Celery
  2. Herbs
  3. Lettucey
  4. Dwarf Kale
  5. Swiss Chard
  6. Pak or Bok choy

Self-pollinated

  1. Determinate tomatoes (check out my post on determinate vs indeterminate tomatoes)
  2. Sweet Peppers
  3. Hot Peppers
  4. Bush Beans
  5. Eggplants
  6. Okra

Manual pollination needed

  1. Strawberries
  2. Dwarf peas

Plants not suited to be grown hydroponically

I mean anything is pretty much possible given enough time, money and willpower. But the list below is going to be a pain in the ass or just not feasible to grow hydroponically. If you had enough space and height you could most likely pull off the indeterminate tomatoes, pole beans, peas, squash, melons, and cucumbers. The root vegetables, onions, and potatoes are just not feasible to be grown in water. Which leaves us with the brassicas, these babies are in this list just given their sheer size.

  1. Indeterminate tomatoes
  2. Root vegetables
  3. Onions
  4. Pole beans
  5. Peas ( I tried and it was a total disaster…they were literally everywhere)
  6. Brassicas (Cauliflower, cabbage, broccoli, etc)
  7. Squash
  8. Melons
  9. Potatoes
  10. Cucumbers
Lemon Spice Jalapeño
Lemon Spice Jalapeno

30 things I have grown in my Aerogarden (so far)

So, I think it’s only fair that I share with you the list of things I have grown in my Aerogarden Farm Plus up to this point. I try to use only heirloom seeds if you’re curious why you can check out my post on 5 Reasons you need to grow heirloom seeds. I have linked each of the items on my list to my favourite seed source Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds, but there are loads of other places you can get them.

  1. Peron tomatoes (semi-determinate)
  2. Cream sausage tomato (determinate)
  3. Sweet Thai basil
  4. Emily (Genovese) basil
  5. Dark purple opal basil
  6. Celery
  7. Cilantro
  8. Thyme
  9. Craig’s giant jalapeno
  10. Lemon spice jalapeno
  11. Orange spice jalapeno
  12. Dill
  13. Mint (but it started to get out of hand and take over)
  14. Dwarf Siberian kale
  15. Micro Tom tomatoes (determinate)
  16. Forellenschluss lettuce
  17. Butter king lettuce
  18. Rouge D’hiver lettuce
  19. Deer tongue lettuce
  20. Black seeded Simpson lettuce
  21. Buttercrunch lettuce
  22. Garnet rose lettuce
  23. Habanero peppers
  24. Mini bell peppers
  25. Golden harvest cherry tomato (determinate)
  26. Chives
  27. Parsley
  28. Red heirloom cherry tomato (determinate)
  29. Parris island lettuce
  30. Marvel of 4 seasons lettuce

If you are new to the wonderful world of Aerogardens or growing hydroponically, you should check out my post on How to clean your Aerogarden. I honestly wouldn’t be without one, I’m even thinking of trying to build my own hydroponic system to use in my grow tent! So hopefully I have answered your questions about what you can grow hydroponically and what you can’t.

What have you grown? Have you pushed the boundaries more than I have?

2 Comments

  • Jen
    May 15, 2020 at 5:59 am

    You’re really talking me into buying a farm model…

    I’m thrilled that you were able to successfully grow celery! That’s one of the staples I am hoping to grow, for the same reason you stated – so many recipes call for a stalk or two.

    I would love to hear more about what exactly happened when you tried to grow cucumbers in your AeroGarden! That’s another essential veggie for me.

    Thanks for the great content!

    Reply
    • Kir
      May 15, 2020 at 7:17 am

      Hi Jen,

      I’m so happy you are getting into the hydroponics game! I love it as it helps extend my short growing season for sure, I’m also thinking of branching out into a grow tent as well. Cucumbers, as I mentioned, are not really suited to growing in an aerogarden as they like to spread out. But I also think anything is possible. I would see if you could track down a dwarf or container variety that might help to limit the spread. Getting the biggest Aerogarden Farm Plus XL may give you a bit more room as it has 1 foot extra in growing space compared to my Farm Plus. You would have to be on top of it and keep it around the lights. But honestly, all you have to lose is a bit of time and a seed so why not try it!

      Keep me posted on how it turns out!
      Happy growing,
      Kir

      Reply

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